Our Leadership Team

Cynthia Larsen, Assistant Director

Cynthia Larsen, Assistant Director
Cynthia Larsen, Assistant Director

Cynthia, Joe’s wife, is an experienced educator and camp person. She has worked at Camp Kamaji in Minnesota, managed a kitchen at a Vermont Youth Corps camp and led her daughter’s girl scout troop. Cynthia and Joe have two children, Abe, age 20 and Mariah, age 17.

Cynthia is cofounder and lead teacher at Lake Erie Ink, a creative writing non-profit organization that provides creative expression opportunities for kids, including summer writing camps. She enjoys teaching as a guest in schools and other organizations, and running workshops on comics, play writing, and all the other genres.

She has an undergraduate degree in English from Stanford, a secondary teaching certificate in English from San Francisco State and and Masters in Fine Arts from the University of Arizona. Cynthia loves to read and write, teach, work outside with plants and animals, go for walks, sing and play music.

Q&A with Cynthia Larsen

What was the first moment you remember being noticed and appreciated by an adult? What did that mean to you?

When I was about eight, our neighbor Kay had two small children and was home with them all the time. I would go over to help her out, and she was an incredibly good listener. I think I must have talked her ear off, as well as spending quite a bit of time making her toddlers laugh. My mother used to joke about how I would help Kay but I wouldn't want to help out as much at home. Pretty typical I think--kids like to help out more when they aren't at home.

When you have 1 hour to yourself (not at camp), what do you like to do?

I like to read. Some people binge on junk food, but I binge on science fiction and fantasy.

Why do you think it's important that kids go to summer camp?

There aren't enough places where kids can really roam around in the woods by themselves any more. I think adults are less likely to let their kids explore the little wild places near their homes these days, and so camp is a great place to explore. Camp is also a place where you can redefine yourself and become a new improved version of yourself because you leave behind the people and places where people expect you to always be who you have been. This interruption in daily life can really give a kid opportunities to try out new ways of relating to people. You are not the kid who cried every day in first grade any more. You're just Cynthia, in the Flicker cabin, a clean slate.

What impact do you hope to have this summer at camp?

I support the work that Joe and the rest of the staff are doing. I am interested in making sure that everyone is treated fairly and that we build a community of caring and acceptance of all people, no matter their background, identity, or preferences. starting the week of staff training. I also keep a close eye and help manage the swim area. I feel strongly about the importance of swimming safely and teaching swimming well.


I'd like to help plan and cook tasty meals for our vegetarians (like quinoa salad). I will also support the counselors in any program area where I can be helpful: arts and crafts and camp farm activities in particular. And of course, I'll always have ideas and activities for creative writing.

Debbie Collins, Director of Operations

Debbie Collins, Director of Operations
Debbie Collins, Director of Operations

Debbie has been at camp for over 30 years. She started working in the kitchen in 1986 and ascended to become camp director in 2006. She is an experienced preschool teacher and preschool director.

During the school year she works in the Conotton Valley School District, right around the corner from camp. Debbie is a mother of four grown children, Chrystal age 40, Jason age 36, Jennifer age 35, and Matthew age 23. She has ten beautiful grandchildren.

She has an undergraduate degree from Kent State University in Education and a Master’s degree from Franciscan University in curriculum and professional development. She has completed graduate coursework and research related to the value of summer camp and how that experience may contribute to success in college.

At camp, she manages the office, communicates with parents, supports campers and helps with counselor supervision and programing.

Q&A with Debbie Collins

You’ve worked at camp for 30 years, what accomplishments are you most proud of?

Through my work over the years, including directing camp for 11 years, I have gained a level of trust and respect from campers, staff, families, camp professionals, and the local community. I feel a strong bond of mutual respect between myself and all of my camp family.  

When you have 1 hour to yourself (not at camp), what do you like to do?

I enjoy quiet reflection, instrumental music, and the beauty of nature. I also enjoy keeping in touch with family and the friends that I have made through my 31 years at camp.

Why do think it's important that kids go to summer camp?

Summer camp is a place where children are able to make independent decisions in a safe environment. It allows them the opportunity to practice important life skills through their daily interactions with others.  

What impact do you hope to have this summer at camp?

The impact that I hope to achieve, every summer, is to establish the trust of campers, parents, and staff as I work to fulfill the mission of camp. I attempt to help every participant grow as a result of their personal experiences.

Heather Quinones, Program Director

Heather Quinones, Program Director
Heather Quinones, Program Director

Heather has a long history in camping and outdoor education. She worked for both Arkansas Game and Fish in their Education Department teaching Project WILD and at Arkansas 4-H center in Ferncliff, Arkansas teaching young and old about the natural world around them. She directed a children’s camp at Crown Point Ecology Center for six years which is where she met Joe one summer a long time ago. She and Joe worked together on the Gearity Learning Garden at his former school in Cleveland Heights.

She has an undergraduate degree from Hiram College, Ohio. And a teaching credential in secondary science from Cleveland State University.

At camp, Heather is our queen of logistics. She makes our programming schedules, assigns counselors to duties and manages counselors. Heather was responsible for designing our farming program and loves doing all sorts of crafts. She is married and has two children, Daniel, age 9 and Rowan, age 6, who both attend camp.

Q&A with Heather Quinones

What was the first moment you remember being noticed and appreciated by an adult? What did that mean to you?

I was first noticed by my 6th grade science teacher. He had grown up with my Uncle and had gone to bootcamp with him during Vietnam. It meant so much to me that he took the time after school to share stories with me about my Uncle. Because of him, I became much more interested in the sciences. If it had not been for this one small gesture and a little time spent with this teacher I might not be where I am today.

When you have 1 hour to yourself (not at camp), what do you like to do?

First, I laugh and laugh at the idea of having time with no one around. On the rare occasion this does happen, I could be found reading a book in my hammock, drawing in my sketch book, or working in one of my gardens here at home. I have difficulty not doing something, even the hammock needs to be swinging.

Why do think it's important that kids go to summer camp?

I grew up going to camps. From age 9 into adulthood I have attended at least one camp a year. I believe summer camp inspires kids to try new things, to be unafraid of the unknown. It allows children to learn how to manage without their parents in a safe environment. They get to make friends from all around the world and learn new cultures. And they get to be silly.

What impact do you hope to have this summer at camp?

This summer my greatest impact at camp will be to see not only an expanded farming program but to know that the staff and campers are comfortable and excited about the way things are running. I want to see the programming grow to include digital things like taking photos and videos for campers to share their experiences. I want to reinvigorate some of the stunning traditions this camp has to offer. And mostly, I want campers and staff to feel valued and important.

Alexandrea Moseley, Communications Director

Alexandrea Moseley, Communications Director
Alexandrea Moseley, Communications Director

2017 was Alexandrea’s first summer at Camp Roosevelt Firebird, but she came with five years of camp experience. As the Firebird Village Director, she managed and supported all Firebird staff members. Her teaching speciality is the challenge course where is the supervisor. In the fall, Alexandrea is transitioning to being camp's Communications Director, which allows her to help with marketing and recruitment as we plan for 2018.

Alexandrea recently graduated from Davidson College where she earned a BA in Hispanic Studies with a mathematics minor. She will unfortunately miss camp next summer due spending much of 2018 in Argentina with a Fulbright Fellowship, but Alexandrea hopes to return to camp after that.

Q and A with Alexandrea

What was the first moment you remember being noticed and appreciated by an adult? What did that mean to you?

My grandfather did a lot of carpentry, and growing up I would spend days during the summer working with him. When I was 10 or so, we needed to build the frames for a floor and wall in a house, and he let me take point on the measurements and assembly. It definitely took longer than it should have, including a trip to the supply store for an extra board after I messed one up, but I was so proud when we were finished. It was a great demonstration of how much kids are capable of with the right direction and supervision.

When you have 1 hour to yourself at camp, what do you like to do?

I love to make friendship bracelets and keychains. Over the years, I’ve gotten really good at making logos and letters, so it’s a great practical craft to have learned at camp because it’s both relaxing and a fun present for friends. I’m planning to tackle a CRF design soon!

Why do you think it’s important that kids go to summer camp?

Camp is the one place where kids can completely and totally be themselves. It’s a refuge from expectations about grades or sports, and by trying new things, campers can find new passions to carry with them throughout the year. The most important thing a counselor can do is to make sure that every camper feels safe, physically, mentally, and emotionally, so that campers feel like they can be as authentic as they please and know that everyone at camp is on their team. When it all comes together, it’s amazing to watch kids step outside of their comfort zone and embrace everything camp has to offer. I imagine that’s what keeps so many of us coming back even after we can’t be campers.

What impact do you hope to have this summer at CRF?

I hope to help make sure that everyone who comes to camp, both campers and staff, has the best possible camp experience and that they always know someone has their back. At the end of the day, what we take away from camp is the relationships that are formed, and I hope to foster an environment where the opportunities for those relationships can flourish. Of course, I’m here to support the Leadership Team and the counselors however I can. Along the way, I would love to contribute some crazy dance moves!

Carl Causby, Head Caretaker

Carl Causby, Head Caretaker
Carl Causby, Head Caretaker

We were so glad to welcome Carl back camp in 2015. He is our head caretaker and site manager. Carl has quite a history with camp; he worked at Firebird for 17 years in the 1970’s and 80’s.

He is a jack of all trades: a cabinet maker, electrician, plumber and all around handy-man. He manages a tree farm near camp. He knows how to care for trees and can skillfully assess safety relating to trees on our property. He operates a small sawmill on his property.

He was born and raised in the local area. Around town, he is a known as a “good man” and in these parts that’s about the highest compliment you can get. He is an invaluable member of our team.

Mike Moore, Assistant Caretaker

Mike Moore, Assistant Caretaker
Mike Moore, Assistant Caretaker

Mike was head caretaker for over 10 years during 2000’s. He is a skilled maintenance man.

Mike is passionate about camp. His specialty is plumbing, though he can do just about anything.

Mike was born and raised in the area. He has worked many jobs, most recently for a home building company. Mike is an avid fisherman and self taught artist. If there’s a job to do, Mike will tackle it.

Pat Moore, Head Cook / Kitchen Manager

Pat Moore, Head Cook / Kitchen Manager
Pat Moore, Head Cook / Kitchen Manager

This will be Pat’s 29th year as cook. She knows the kitchen like no other.

Pat worked as a cook in the Conotton Valley Schools for many years. After taking some time away fom camp, and newly retired, she is thrilled to be back cooking for us.

Not only a cook, Pat enjoys the camp community and can often be found laughing and interacting with staff and campers. She loves camp with all her heart and fondly refers to this second home as “The Bird”.